Neurocentre du Valais

Neurology

NeurologyNeurocentre du Valais

The neurology department is based at the Sion site, and has an inpatient unit with its own dedicated stroke unit. The department also offers a wide range of outpatient clinics for the following diseases: cerebrovascular diseases, epilepsy, abnormal movements (tremors, Parkinson’s, etc.), multiple sclerosis and related diseases, headache, neuropathy, etc. It also has a clinical neurophysiology centre that performs electroencephalograms (EEGs) for both children and adults, sensory, visual and auditory evoked potentials, carotid and transcranial ultrasound/Doppler and electroneuromyographies (ENMGs).

Finally, in collaboration with the geriatric department, the neurology department participates in and supervises memory clinics for patients of all ages – but mainly the elderly – with cognitive disorders.

Examinations

Electroencephalograms (EEGs)

The electroencephalogram or EEG is an examination that records the electrical activity of the brain. This involves applying an electrode to the head in a painless and invasive manner. 
The examination makes it possible to detect abnormalities in people with epilepsy, and specify the type involved. 

Practical advice for patients:

  • As the electrodes are placed on the scalp, it is best not to apply any hair products that could impair the recording process.
  • The examination is sometimes carried out after sleep deprivation, and you will be asked to take a nap during the examination. You will be informed by your neurologist or neuropaediatrician if this is the case.

 

Carotid ultrasound/Doppler

This examination allows the arteries of the brain to be explored in a non-invasive way and without irradiation, and the circulation within the brain can also be accessed. These examinations are carried out mainly in the context of strokes, follow-up after carotid artery surgery and as part of the preoperative assessment of certain forms of cardiac surgery.

 

Electromyoneurography (ENMG)

ENMG records the functioning of nerves and muscles. The examination involves stimulating certain nerves and recording their response, which makes it possible to measure how fast and how much they work. Muscle activity can also be recorded.

Evoked potentials

Somatosensory evoked potential (SEP)
This examination makes it possible to analyse the brain’s response to a sensory signal, and is used if nerve or spinal damage is suspected.

Practical advice for patients:

  • As the electrodes are placed on the scalp, it is best not to apply any hair products that could impair the recording process.
  • Electrical stimulation is applied to the wrists and ankles. This stimulation is painless and completely safe.

 

Auditory evoked potential (AEP)
This examination makes it possible to analyse the brain’s response to an auditory signal (noise), and is used in patients with suspected hearing loss, newborns in particular.

Visual evoked potential (VEP)
This examination makes it possible to analyse the brain’s response to a visual signal, and is used in patients with suspected optic nerve damage.

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